Review: Ooma Office, your solution to poor business phone services

Review: Ooma Office, your solution to poor business phone services
November 01 12:07 2014 Print This Article

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How many people are on crappy business phone services from major providers? Many. Do you get what you pay for? Probably not. Well, look no more cause Ooma Office is here and it’s going to save you a fortune with a ton of features.

Ooma Office is a full scaled phone system splurged with features you could only have dreamed of. Many years ago I did a review on the old TrustedNerd.com for Ooma when it first came out and people just wanted more about Ooma. Well, Ooma has delivered and with their Ooma Office solution, it will keep you drooling. Ooma Office can handle multiple phone lines, conference calls, voicemail and even a hosted PBX with a virtual receptionist. It will even support your remote workers, how great can this get?

Right now, I am with Shaw for my business and I get like nothing out of it, no special features, nothing. I get a toll free number that all it does is forward to another line and I have absolutely no control over it. I can’t have a virtual receptionist or any of the amazing features I have with Ooma on Shaw cause Shaw is so behind the times.

Did you know that if you wanted all the features that Ooma Office offered on a traditional phone system it would mean custom installation which would be costly along with high monthly costs? Well, with Ooma Office you can have a full virtual PBX that can support multiple phone lines, five extensions, and 15 virtual extensions at a low cost.

With the Ooma Office kit, you get the base station and two Lynx devices which act as virtual extensions. Additional Lynx devices run at $50 each, so it’s relatively inexpensive. You get one phone number and the ability to port your existing number to Ooma Office for free.

The Lynx modules communicate over DECT 6.0 to the base station so they won’t interfere with your Wi-Fi network. The Ooma Office hardware costs $250 and starts at $19.98 / month for all these features. Calls to the USA and Canada are free and International calls are billed to a prepaid account that you can reload in $25 increments. Ooma Office works over VOIP so it will require an internet connection. There is also no handset included with the Ooma Office and at this time it’s incompatible with the standard Ooma wireless handsets, one feature I do wish they’d add.

Like I mentioned, Ooma Office has a splurge of features, here are a few of my favorites. I LOVE the virtual receptionist as it makes you seem like you have a huge company when really you’re a single person company like me, or a small business. If I wanted to have something like this, I’d need to setup a hosted PBX or have a service like Grasshopper (which isn’t bad at all, but it’s an additional fee). You have the ability to have a synthesized voice which is “ok” but doesn’t sound that great, it could be a bit better, it just sounds a bit too robotic. You also have an after hours schedule with an after hours menu too, which is really useful along with a holiday schedule. You do have the option to upload your own audio file for each key assignment in your virtual receptionist, so if people don’t like the robotic sounding voice. You can have different options for key assignments which are dial by name, play announcement or transfer the call. It’s incredibly easy to setup as well with most users setting the whole virtual receptionist up in under 15 minutes, it’s just that easy.

With the virtual receptionist, I do wish they had sub-menus. Basically so I could have it say “Press 1 for technical support” and then when the user presses 1 say “Press 1 now for phone support, 2 for internet support, 3 for TV support.” Hopefully that feature will come soon!

You can also add a toll free number to your account at $9.99 / month with 500 minutes of free calling. Additional minutes are relatively inexpensive.

The second feature I really love is the conferencing feature. Yes, you do have a conferencing feature built into Ooma Office which is fairly basic but gets the job done. There is no functionality at this time to record the conference call, something I do wish they’d add.

You can also send faxes from Ooma Office incredibly easy using their web interface, I just love that feature as I can attach a document, input the number and boom, sent.

So each phone that is connected to Ooma Office has it’s own 3 digit extension, such as 100, 101, 102.

Each extension has it’s own voicemail that is protected via PIN. Voicemail messages can be converted to text and then emailed to that person, which I find useful. You also have the ability to set up ring groups which mean when a certain number is pressed (for example, 1 for sales), all extensions assigned to sales will ring at the same time. Of course, you also have the ability to place calls on hold with hold music.

Overall, WOW. Ooma has done it again with a great solution but for business users. I’m beyond impressed but I do wish that a few small tweaks were made to some features (as outlined earlier). If you want a great deal, pick yours up today here and if you want $50 off your Ooma Office, email me at jonathan [at] trustednerd.com and I’ll refer you for a $50 credit (limited time only). {rating}

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About Article Author

Jonathan Yaniv
Jonathan Yaniv

Jonathan is the founder and editor-in-chief of TrustedNerd.com. Covering major tech shows such as CES, Jonathan is always there for the latest tech news. Want your gadget to be reviewed or have a release you'd like to be considered for publishing? Send Jonathan an email, jonathan [at] trustednerd.com

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