Review: LG G3

Review: LG G3
October 19 11:22 2014 Print This Article

LG G3

The LG G3, amazing and functional. LG has been at the top of innovation in the mobile space lately with the LG G Flex, G Watch and the rumoured G Watch R. They have continued this innovation with the LG G3 and wow does this phone ever stand out! Am I in love with it? You bet your socks off I am! I just can’t get this phone out of my hands, it’s just so… amazing!

From the fluid design of the LG G3 to it’s beautiful interface, LG has placed itself as a competitor to Apple right next to Samsung and HTC. Most people when they think of LG, they think of home appliances but home appliances isn’t the only thing LG does. With the LG G3, LG proves it knows what the consumers want and they put it into a package that fits into your hand.

Is the LG G3 the perfect smartphone? Yes. The LG G3 has a QHD screen that performs and really stands out! It has 538 PPI sharpness and Samsung’s phones have 440 PPI sharpness. That just tells you how great of a display this is. All I can truly say is “wow!”

Let’s talk a bit about the interface. I remember with the LG G2, there were a lot of complaints around the interface, people called it “cartoony.” Now with the LG G3 the interface has significantly improved. It’s a flat design like iOS 7 and iOS 8 and is super easy but LG’s interface needed this update, desperately.

With the G2, there was a plastically shell if anyone remembers that, which made the device look cheap. The LG G3 has a very sexy metallic look that doesn’t make me embarrassed of using it. It looks and acts like a premium smartphone. I do wish that LG had a unibody design with an intergrated battery on the LG G3, there is no need to remove a smartphone battery anymore.

I performed a few drop tests on the LG G3 on the back (not on the screen) and it performs amazingly well. The back does come a bit loose on dropping it several times which is another reason why I do suggest having a unibody design. I don’t know any user who swaps batteries so really, why do we need a removable battery? The short answer is, we don’t. It’s come to the day and age that people will carry around a portable battery pack as needed as these are so cheap and easy to carry around.

In regards to the camera, LG really advanced here also. The LG G3 sports a 13 MP camera with laser auto-focus. Because it’s laser autofocus, it’s the fastest auto-focus currently on the market. Not even the iPhone 6 or iPhone 6 Plus have laser autofocus. The laser auto focus works by sending out a conical infra-red signal and absorbs the information from the surroundings to capture such an amazing image.

The front “selfie” camera is a 2.1 MP camera and has a flash, but it’s not an LED flash, just the screen goes white making it illuminate your face. It would be cool if LG has a front facing LED flash, but perhaps that’s for the LG G4?

In terms of the design, again, LG really should have delivered a full metallic phone, not this plastic skin to make it look like a metallic phone. But again, the phone DOES look great. The LG G3 does have a microSD card slot and the LG G3 does come in 16 and 32 GB models. The display is 5.5 inches which feels really nice in my hand and is great looking at. It’s borderline phablet.

Here’s a feature that took getting used to. On the back of the phone, you have your power button and your volume rockers. It took about 2 weeks to get used to, and even then I’m still not used to it. However, the buttons look great and I love them. They truly give the smartphone a premium look and feel. The buttons are very well placed and LG did a great job with the placement. Even on other phones now I find myself fingering back to turn on and off the device.

I really like that the metallic design isn’t prone to fingerprints, unlike other phones that I’ve tested that are fingerprint heaven.

Let’s talk a bit about knock code. Knock code is LG’s stance to security. It’s simple, tap the screen twice when turned off to unlock, and then tap the notification bar twice or any area on the home screen to shut it down. It’s a little finicky at times. Personally, I prefer phones to have something similar to iPhone’s Touch ID. Touch ID is simple and easy to use as I’m going to press the home button anyways. Knocking on the screen, it’s just not my thing.

The LG G3 packs an enormous battery at 3,000 mAh. Battery life all depends on what you are doing. If you’re watching video, the battery isn’t going to last forever. However, with using the LG G3 for phone calls, expect relatively good battery life. It’s just where you start to engage all of those QHD pixels in full HD where the battery life starts to take a real hit.

If you need additional power, you could get a pack from ZeroLemon that would give you an additional 9,000 mAh of juice for your LG G3.

Here’s what I don’t care for, the buttons on the back need to have an additional feature or something so you don’t accidentally turn it on and click “Emergency Call.” It’s so super easy to do that when the LG G3 is in your pocket. The “metallic” back on the LG G3 scratches very easily and you can’t just brush them out like on the G-Flex.

The display is prone to fingerprints and doesn’t have any finish to prevent fingerprints on the display. The metallic back is somewhat fingerprint friendly, however.

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Review Summary

4 out of 5
Design
4 out of 5
Performance
4 out of 5
Price
4 out of 5
Functionality
4 out of 5

Overall, it's a really good device it just needs some minor improvements for the LG G4 and I'm sure the "G" series will continue to have an impact in the mobile space. 

4 Good 4 out of 5
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About Article Author

Jonathan Yaniv
Jonathan Yaniv

Jonathan is the founder and editor-in-chief of TrustedNerd.com. Covering major tech shows such as CES, Jonathan is always there for the latest tech news. Want your gadget to be reviewed or have a release you’d like to be considered for publishing? Send Jonathan an email, jonathan [at] trustednerd.com

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